A brief personal background

I promised myself I would never blog about my life, but coronavirus’ stay-at-home situation is somewhat boring. So, here we go. Maybe I’ll stop after coronavirus is over. Maybe I won’t. I figured why not start with a small insight into who I am. Tinder-style, i.e., only the good stuff. This is me drinking glühwein…

Leaders matter!

Regulatory agencies nowadays are supposed to have a certain degree of independence… Slo’s article touches on the matter of independence, from an exciting angle…

Certifications – a good forty years before we started writing about them

Some of us, scholars studying certifications, like to think that our field is very new. Yet, Taylor was writing about certifications a good forty years before we started thinking about them…

Can certifications become the new normal?

Certifications ask customers to meet XYZ requirements. However, for certifications to change entire sectors/industries, one or more of the following things need to happen…

Christmas, Brexit, regulation, and how ‘good’ and ‘bad’ uncertainty is fundamentally the same

As a child, during the Christmas season, gifts greatly determined the activities for the holidays. If the gift was a soccer ball, one spent the holidays playing football. If the gift was a remote control car, one spent the holidays driving that car up and down the street. In my case, my parents never told…

The difference between risk and uncertainty – without using the coin example

Risk and uncertainty are undoubtedly linked, but uncertainty is not the same as risk. We know this but sometimes, to not think deeply about it, we repeat the coin script when asked about the difference: Imagine you flip a coin 100 times. If the coin were perfectly balanced, the final tally would read 50/50. However,…

Rapid snapshot of certification in voluntary carbon markets

The shortest summary of my PhD is the following: it’s hard to be a voluntary carbon offset certification! Don’t believe me? Check out the figure below, which shows the total value generated by the most prominent certifications in voluntary carbon markets between the launch of the first fully-fledged certification in the market and the beginning…

The most puzzling [and somewhat ironic] question in carbon markets

Carbon markets date back to the 1960s when Ronald Coase’s idea of a pricing mechanism for the allocation of radio frequencies in the United States (US), which he then applied to questions of public harms such as environmental damages, which saw significant improvement in the context of carbon markets by academics in the late 1960s…

Carbon markets – the simple and the not so simple

Have you ever been told that carbon markets/trading are an inherently complex/complicated topic that only experts understand? Well, you’ve been lied to. Twice! In a single sentence! The first lie is that the matter is inherently complex/complicated. Explaining what carbon trading is, or even what a carbon market entails, is, in fact, surprisingly simple: That’s…

Source: Seattle Municipal Archives via Flickr ( https://flic.kr/p/rgen12 ) - Unmodified. License: CC BY 2.0 ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ ).

Is the US a producer or a consumer of energy?

A very smart student recently inquired about whether the United States (US) should be considered an energy consumer or an energy producer given the boost in oil and gas production seen in the past few years – thanks to the shale revolution. A very good question, as the whole consumer/producer differentiation is becoming increasingly fuzzy…